As what type of king or leader is Macbeth presented?

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Macbeth definitely isn't a good king, and that's probably why he is dead by the end of the play. Here are some not-so-great things about Macbeth's leadership skills:

1. He's wicked. This is a pretty solid case for knocking someone out of the "good king" category, and Macbeth proves...

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Macbeth definitely isn't a good king, and that's probably why he is dead by the end of the play. Here are some not-so-great things about Macbeth's leadership skills:

1. He's wicked. This is a pretty solid case for knocking someone out of the "good king" category, and Macbeth proves that he has a dark heart. The witches tell Macbeth that he will be king, and he (with some prodding via his wife) jumps to a murderous plot. When his wife pushes him to take murderous action, he listens to her. As a man who wishes to be king, Macbeth lacks personal resolve and foresight to make honorable decisions and instead works in schemes and plots to achieve what he sees as his fate. When he begins to waver in his resolve, Macbeth reminds himself that

Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
And take the present horror from the time,
Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives.
Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives. (2.1.66–69)

A man on a mission, he is not deterred by his conscience, and he murders Duncan. And then he murders Duncan's guards. His actions don't improve from this point, and this is a catalyst for his downfall.

2. He's weak. Macbeth is easily swayed into his "fate" by the witches. Soon after their departure, he says,

Two truths are told,
As happy prologues to the swelling act
Of the imperial theme. (1.3.140–142)

The truth sounds promising to Macbeth, so he's willing to believe in it. It's worth noting here that the witches never mention that Macbeth murders Duncan; he makes that leap all on his own.

He is also pretty weak when it comes to his wife. When he tries to call off Duncan's murder, his wife replies,

Art thou afeard
To be the same in thine own act and valor
As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that
Which thou esteem’st the ornament of life,
And live a coward in thine own esteem,
Letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would,
”Like the poor cat i’ th’ adage?

Lady Macbeth insults his bravery and questions his manhood, and this is enough to sway Macbeth back to murder. His wife's ambition propels Macbeth to commit heinous acts—not exactly the kind of qualities one looks for in a good king.

3. He's mentally unstable. Along the journey, Macbeth sees a bloody dagger that his hands seem to pass through. Later he sees the ghost of Banquo and starts speaking to it—and then trying to rationalize this behavior to his guests at the feast. When the witches return near the end of the play with further predictions, Macbeth is unable to reason his own demise from their words.

Although Macbeth was once a brave and admired soldier, his flaws lead him to be a corrupt and dishonorable man, which leads to his ultimate destruction.

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First, Macbeth's willingness to kill innocents paints him as a tyrant, wielding almost absolute power and capable of immense cruelty. At least he has a reason to kill Banquo and Fleance—it isn't totally motivated by malice—but he has no reason to order the murders of Macduff's wife and children except for pure, unadulterated viciousness. 

Second, Macduff's description of Scotland under Macbeth's rule presents him as a ruler that has driven his country into the dust with his own selfishness and greed. Macduff says, "Each new morn / New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows / Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds / As if it felt with Scotland and yelled out / Like syllable of dolor" (4.3.4-8). Scotland is, apparently, in such bad shape that men can be killed out of nowhere (presumably, by Macbeth's orders or because men must rob one another to support their families and themselves—a situation indicated by Macbeth's earlier conversation with the men he's hired to murder Banquo), that heaven itself feels so terribly for the country that it cries with it. 

Further, Macduff says, "Bleed, bleed, poor country! / Great tyranny, lay thou thy basis sure, / For goodness dare not check thee" (4.3.32-34). He names Macbeth as a tyrant and insists that Scotland will continue to suffer under his rule because even good men are afraid to stand up to him. It is ironic that Macbeth is basically ruining the very country he wanted so badly to rule; perhaps it was really only the king's position that he craved and not the responsibilities that go with it. In any case, he is presented as the worst kind of ruler who puts himself ahead of his country and his people's needs.

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Macbeth is a very egocentric, power-hungry leader. He starts off by being a loyal follower to his king, hesitant to act against Duncan. As Lady Macbeth says in Act I, he has the ambition but lacks the drive to do what is necessary. However, after he becomes king, this attitude changes greatly. he becomes like a dictator. Macduff seeks out Malcolm because of how poorly Macbeth rules. Had Macbeth been a good, able leader, the revolt against him would not have been so strong or fierce. Macbeth becomes very proud, largely because of his false interpretation of the witches prophecies. he degrades those who express fear or concern, and he waves off important information given to him. His whole concern is keeping his power at all costs. This extreme grasping at power that should not belong to him is part of what leads to his downfall.

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