What are two of the poetic elements that Poe uses most often in "The Raven?"

Expert Answers
booboosmoosh eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven," the two poetic elements he uses more than any other would be repetition and rhyme. Onomatopoeia would be a close third, I would think.

We see repetition in:

As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
"'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door--

...with "at my chamber door." And of course, "nothing more" and "Evermore."

Rhyme is used a great deal, as well. Poe is well known not only for end rhyme, but also internal rhyme. An example of this would be: "Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary," with the words "dreary" and "weary" rhyming.

End rhyme is also used:

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore--
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
"'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door--
Only this and nothing more."

Words that show end rhyme from this stanza are: lore, door and more.

Onomatopoeia is easy to hear with words such as "rapping" and "tapping."

The rhythm, as well as the elements listed above, gives the poem a melodic and musical sense of swaying back and forth, and the verse appeals strongly to the ear.

Read the study guide:
The Raven

Access hundreds of thousands of answers with a free trial.

Start Free Trial
Ask a Question