What are two lines in which personification is used to give human traits to the Happylife Home operating system in "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury? 

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The technologically advanced Happylife Home seems to function as a person because of all it does for the family. Some images of personification, or describing the house as if it is a person, are the following:

[the house] clothed and fed and rocked them to sleep and played and sang and was good to them.

This implies the house is like a nanny or parent to the family, even the adults. It also implies that the house infantilizes them.

Lydia herself personifies the house when she says to George,

"The house is wife and mother now, and nursemaid."

George speaks to the dining room table, and it responds as if it is a person:

“We forgot the ketchup,” he [George] said.

“Sorry,” said a small voice within the table, and ketchup appeared.

When Mr. McClean, the psychologist, comes, he also speaks of the nursery as if it is a person:

This room is their mother and father, far more important in their lives than their real parents.

When he and Mr. Hadley switch off the nursery, they "threw the switch that...

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