Rules of the Game by Amy Tan

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What are two examples of personification in "Rules of the Game"?  

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Personification is the use of figurative language in which something nonhuman is described using human traits or characteristics. This is similar to anthropomorphism. The main difference is that, with anthropomorphism, the nonhuman entity (animal, object, idea, etc.) actually takes on the human attribute. (A good example of this is in Animal Farm, in which the animals actually speak.)

The wind is the key symbolic element being personified in this story. Note that at the beginning, we get the first lesson from Waverly's mother:

Strongest wind cannot be seen.

Waverly will learn to be silent and strong like this wind.

As mentioned in a previous answer, the wind whispers secrets only Waverly can hear. In this, her first tournament, she wins her first match. After saying Check, "the wind roared with laughter." The wind is personified as laughing with Waverly's victory. This is the same wind whispering chess secrets and strategies to her. The wind is on her side.

At the end of the story, Waverly goes...

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