What are two examples of alliteration in "The Necklace"?

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Alliteration is the repetition of sounds at the beginning of a set of words in close proximity. For example, tongue twisters are alliterative because they tend to repeat the same sound at the beginning of adjacent words (i.e., She sells seashells down by the seashore—the s sound is repeated). Alliteration...

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Alliteration is the repetition of sounds at the beginning of a set of words in close proximity. For example, tongue twisters are alliterative because they tend to repeat the same sound at the beginning of adjacent words (i.e., She sells seashells down by the seashore—the s sound is repeated). Alliteration is a device used to draw the reader’s attention to specific important details that they might otherwise pass right over. By drawing the reader’s attention, the author is helping the readers understand something deeper within the text, usually something related to theme or characterization.

Example 1

In paragraph four of the story, Maupassant uses alliteration when describing some of the finer things that Mathilde desires. In the paragraph, there is alliteration to focus on things like “shining silverware,” “fairy forests,” and “delicious dishes.” Each of these things is a fantasy that Mathilde entertains while her husband enjoys the simple dinner they can afford. Maupassant uses the alliteration to help the reader understand how enraptured Mathilde is within finery and wealth, a crucial part in understanding the underlying themes of the work.

Example 2

In paragraph eleven, after her husband hands Mathilde the invitation to an extravagant party, she finds a problem with it. Maupassant uses alliteration in the phrase, “her husband had hoped”—which draws the reader’s attention to the disposition of Monsieur Loisel, who only wishes for his wife to be happy. However, we are shown even more her desire for extravagance, in how she is not pleased as her husband expects. Instead, we see even more clearly how she is selfish in the face of a kind deed from her husband. This makes the suffering she goes through all the more cathartic at the end of the story.

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Alliteration occurs when words beginning with the same consonant are placed in close proximity. This creates a sense of rhythm in a poem or a story that can add to our enjoyment of it. One point to note, however, is that we are reading the story in translation from the French—we must assume that if a translator provides alliteration it mimics the original, but it most likely will not be exactly the same. Also, alliterations might vary from translation to translation.

That being said, in "The Necklace," an example of alliteration is as follows:

She waited all day, in the same condition of mad fear before this terrible calamity.

In this sentence, the alliterative "c"s of "condition" and "calamity" place an emphasis on these two words—the condition the Loisels are in has not changed and this is a calamity for them.

A second example is below:

the prospect of all the physical privations . . .

This what Monsieur Loisel is thinking about as he borrows money to replace the necklace. The repeated "p" sounds create a rhythmic cadence in this line.

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Alliteration is the repetition of initial consonant sounds in consecutive words or words that appear near one another.  What is important in alliteration is the sound, not the letter.  Therefore, "cool kites" would qualify as alliteration because of the repetition of the hard c/k sound at the beginning of the words.  On the other hand, "charming cats" would not qualify as alliteration because, although both words start with the letter "c," the ch- sound and the k- sound are not the same sounds.  

In the line, "Natural ingenuity, instinct for what is elegant, a supple mind, are their sole hierarchy," "supple" and "sole" present an example of alliteration with the repeated "s" sound.

In the line, "Mathilde suffered ceaselessly," the repeated "s"/soft "c" sound at the beginning of "suffered" and "ceaselessly" is another example.

In the line, "The sight of the little Breton peasant who did her humble housework," the "h" sound at the beginnings of "who," "humble," and "housework" present another example of alliteration.

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First, I want to make sure that there is a clear understanding of what alliteration is, and how to identify it within a work of literature. At the most basic level, alliteration is the use of two or more of the same letter or sounds, that occur subsequently and often consecutively within a sentence. It is important to remember that alliteration is concerned with consonant sounds; the repetition of vowel sounds is another literary term.

With that in mind, the specific examples of alliteration within The Necklace can be found below.

Example 1:

All those things, of which another woman of her rank would never even have been conscious, tortured her and made her angry. 

In the above example, the repetition of the W in which, woman, and would, exemplifies alliteration. The repetition here is used to emphasize her feeling of inadequacy and anger about her relative social standing. 

Example 2:

When she sat down to dinner, before the round table covered with a table- cloth three days old, opposite her husband, who uncovered the soup- tureen and declared with an enchanted air, "Ah, the good pot-au-feu! I don't know anything better than that," she thought of dainty dinners, of shining silverware, of tapestry which peopled the walls with ancient personages and with strange birds flying in the midst of fairy forest; and she thought of delicious dishes served on marvellous plates, and of the whispered gallantries which you listen to with a sphinx-like smile, while you are eating the pink flesh of trout or the wings of a quail. 

While long, the above example showcases alliteration in a few different places. Initially, alliteration can be found with the repetition of the letter D in the line about dainty dishes, and the letter S, in shining silverware. Alliteration is again found in the line about fairy forest, and delicious dishes, with the F and D repeating respectively. These examples of alliteration are painting a fanciful picture, which models the picture in our main character's head. 

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