What are two different settings in To Kill a Mockingbird?I need to have two different settings and explain their effects on the book. I was thinking of using the Ewell house but I don't know...

What are two different settings in To Kill a Mockingbird?

I need to have two different settings and explain their effects on the book. I was thinking of using the Ewell house but I don't know what it effects.

Asked on by madi40459

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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If you are considering different places within Maycomb, then you certainly have a number of places from which to choose. There are the homes of the Finches, Ewells and Radleys, as well as that of Miss Maudie. There is also the courthouse and the jail, where two important events took place. If you want to explore outside Maycomb, there is always Finch's Landing.

Using the Ewells as an example, their home is a place of hatred, ignorance and poverty. Fittingly located next to the dump, the Ewell house's inhabitants are the trashiest family in town and have been the "disgrace of Maycomb County for three generations." Bob Ewell is rarely home, and he serves as the worst possible example of a father. He drinks up his paycheck, provides little for his children, and turns over the responsibilities of the household to his eldest daughter, Mayella. Inside the house reside a number of children, none of whom bother to attend school for more than one day each year. They are dirty and play in the dump; Burris comes to school filthy and lice-ridden and then curses the teacher as he walks out of class. The house is the scene of the novel's most serious and disturbing event: Inside, the kindly Tom Robinson is sexually attacked by Mayella and then accused by the Ewells of raping her. Outside the house, further racism and hatred is displayed when Bob "croons" foul words as Tom's widow passes by and from which rocks are thrown at passing cars. It is a house sorely in need of being vacated by its occupants and demolished by the town in order to erase the stigma that is attached to it.

In contrast, Atticus's house is one of love and understanding. He stresses education to his children, providing them with plenty of books to read and an independent yet tolerant outlook on life and their neighbors. Atticus serves as an excellent role model for his children, teaching them right from wrong through his own actions. The house is welcome to neighbors, especially Dill and Miss Maudie, and it is the scene of one of the novel's most insightful gatherings: Aunt Alexandra's hosting of her church Missionary Circle.

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