What are the transformations Eliza Doolittle undergoes in Pygmalion? How do these transformations affect the ways that others think about her and behave towards her?

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The types of transformations undergone by Eliza Doolittle indicate, in a very astute manner, what constituted the concept of an upper-middle or upper class lady in her period. They embrace every aspect of her character and appearance; it is not until she has completely transformed every aspect of her outward...

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The types of transformations undergone by Eliza Doolittle indicate, in a very astute manner, what constituted the concept of an upper-middle or upper class lady in her period. They embrace every aspect of her character and appearance; it is not until she has completely transformed every aspect of her outward being that she is fully accepted in "polite" society.

Voice and Accent: The initial transformation proposed by Professor Higgins is purely vocal. In the England of that period (and even to the present day), accent is a clear indicator of socio-economic status. Her voice, trained by expert linguist Higgins, is what first (falsely) convinces people that she is an aristocrat.

Personal Hygiene: As Eliza points out, the conditions of extreme poverty in which she lived made bathing impractical, and many of the upper class concepts of appropriate personal hygiene are quite alien to her. Dirt defined her as a member of the lower classes and repulsed members of the upper classes. Mrs. Pearce originally reacts to her with disdain because of her appearance. She is treated with greater respect by everyone when she appears after being cleaned up.

Manners and Conversation: Pickering especially and Mrs. Higgins teach Eliza not just the proper accent but appropriate topics of conversation and the degree of self-restraint that is considered essential to proper behavior. 

Once Eliza has managed to assimilate herself into the outward style and manners of upper class society, she becomes accepted in it. Interestingly, one of her more astute observations is that this is a two-way process and that it was, to a great degree, Pickering treating her like a lady that enabled her to become one.

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