Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

Shooting an Elephant book cover
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What is the tone and setting of "Shooting an Elephant?"

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In a clever and typically British wry remark, the introductory sentence of "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell indicates the relationship between the Burmese and himself, a relationship that extends to the one between the British and the Burmese people:

In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people--the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me.

Later in the passage, Orwell writes,

Theoretically--and secretly, of course--I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressor, the British.  As for the job I was doing. I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 342 words.)

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