What is the tone of the poem "Caged Bird"?

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Certainly, there is a poignancy to this poem. Much like Paul Dunbar's poem, "Sympathy," in which he writes, "I know why the caged bird sings," Maya Angelou continues this motif of the caged bird who sings in order to keep his spirit alive. 

his wings are clipped and   
his feet...

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Certainly, there is a poignancy to this poem. Much like Paul Dunbar's poem, "Sympathy," in which he writes, "I know why the caged bird sings," Maya Angelou continues this motif of the caged bird who sings in order to keep his spirit alive. 

his wings are clipped and   
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.
 
He "opens his throat" in order to release the outpouring of feelings, his frustration, his sorrow, his despair. He sings because he must, and yet he also sings for the same reason all birds sing: they communicate with one another; for, somewhere there is a free bird who hears this caged bird, so that vicariously the bird whose feet are tied can feel free, at least in spirit. 
This poem evokes the sympathy of its reader for the bird who cannot soar under the sun with the wind beneath his wings. Still, the bird's spirit is resilient and the imprisoned bird expresses his desire to soar despite his bindings. The overall tone of the poem is sorrowful, but persevering.
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