Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights book cover
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What does the title Wuthering Heights symbolize?

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The title Wuthering Heights refers to the Earnshaw family home, built by an ancestor called Hareton Earnshaw around 1500.

The house represents many things in the novel. Firstly, it is the childhood home of Heathcliff and Catherine, the place where they lived as siblings, before Hindley's abuse and Catherine's engagement to the refined Edgar Linton drove Heathcliff away. For the star-crossed lovers, Wuthering Heights is a haven, a reminder of the wild joys of their childhood before class divisions drove them apart. Other characters do not associate Wuthering Heights with joy. For Isabella Linton and, later, Cathy Linton, Wuthering Heights is a prison, where abuse is a daily occurrence.

Heathcliff's ownership of the house illustrates his obsession with the past and especially with Catherine. He covets the house not only to get revenge on Hindley but also because it was the one place where he was allowed to be happy as a boy.

The title of the house is also significant: the term "wuthering"...

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