Macbeth Questions and Answers
by William Shakespeare

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How does Macduff show his guilt in the play Macbeth?

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Thomas Mccord eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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As the previous educator has shown, there are many examples of how Macduff demonstrates his guilt over the deaths of King Duncan, as well as his wife and son. His response to guilty feelings is to take action. He wants to avenge these deaths by physically attacking and removing Macbeth.

It is also worth looking at act 5, scene 7 because in this scene, there is an example of how Macduff’s guilt links to one of the play’s wider themes, the supernatural. Here is the specific quote:

If thou beest slain, and with no stroke of mine,

My wife and children’s ghosts will haunt me still.
Macduff is saying that if he does not kill Macbeth with his own hands, if he lets another man do it, the ghosts of his wife and child will continue to haunt him. This is significant because it implies that since their deaths, his wife and child have haunted him at night. Macduff believes that the only way to end these supernatural visits is to kill Macbeth, the man who ordered their murders. When Macbeth is dead, he...

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