What are three ways that Amir receives redemption in the novel The Kite Runner?

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Amir begins his long quest for redemption when he returns to Pakistan, and then Afghanistan, in June 2001. Meeting with Baba's old friend, Rahim Khan in Pakistan, Amir learns that Hassan is dead; Hassan has a son somewhere in Afghanistan; and that Hassan is actually his half-brother, fathered by Baba and...

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Amir begins his long quest for redemption when he returns to Pakistan, and then Afghanistan, in June 2001. Meeting with Baba's old friend, Rahim Khan in Pakistan, Amir learns that Hassan is dead; Hassan has a son somewhere in Afghanistan; and that Hassan is actually his half-brother, fathered by Baba and Sanaubar. Amir's step toward atonement comes when he rescues Sohrab from the Taliban while nearly being beaten to death in the process. It is during the beating that Amir first feels the freedom of his sins.

My body was broken--just how badly I wouldn't find out until later--but I felt healed. Healed at last.

Safely arriving with Sohrab in Pakistan, Amir heals his wounds before beginning the search for the Caldwells, who were to take Sohrab into their home. But Amir discovers that the Caldwells are fictitious, contrived by Rahim Khan in order to guarantee that Amir would locate Sohrab. So, Amir decides to return home to California with Sohrab, and make him a member of his family--something that he had never been able to accept with Hassan. But Sohrab's suicide attempt lengthens Amir's stay.

When they finally arrive in California, Sohrab is unable to adapt to his new surroundings, rarely speaking and withdrawing into a world of his own. But in the final chapter, when Amir takes Sohrab kite-flying, Amir finds himself acting out one final form of redemption: He volunteers to run Sohrab's kite, just as Hassan had done so many times for him.

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