What are three similarities of 1984 to Hitler and Nazism? What is the message to the people?

1. In Orwell's classic novel 1984, Oceania has a centralized, autocratic government, which is similar to Germany's government under the Nazi regime. Adolf Hitler was the dictator and leader of the Nazi Party, which controlled virtually every aspect of German society. Similar to Adolf Hitler, Big Brother is the figurehead of the Party, which also controls every aspect of society. The citizens have no individual freedoms and must comply with government policies at all times. 2. The Party in Orwell's classic novel and the Nazi regime both oppress their respective populations through the use of propaganda, scapegoats, surveillance, and the threat of violence.

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1. In Orwell's classic novel 1984 , Oceania has a centralized, autocratic government, which is similar to Germany's government under the Nazi regime. Adolf Hitler was the dictator and leader of the Nazi Party, which controlled virtually every aspect of German society. Similar to Adolf Hitler, Big Brother is...

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1. In Orwell's classic novel 1984, Oceania has a centralized, autocratic government, which is similar to Germany's government under the Nazi regime. Adolf Hitler was the dictator and leader of the Nazi Party, which controlled virtually every aspect of German society. Similar to Adolf Hitler, Big Brother is the figurehead of the Party, which also controls every aspect of society. The citizens have no individual freedoms and must comply with government policies at all times.

2. The Party in Orwell's classic novel and the Nazi regime both oppress their respective populations through the use of propaganda, scapegoats, surveillance, and the threat of violence. Pro-Nazi propaganda manufactured a collective viewpoint of the world for the German population; in this view, Hitler and the Nazi Party were always in the right, and Nazi Germany was by far the most powerful nation on earth. The Gestapo, Nazi Germany's secret police force, spied on, arrested, and murdered political dissidents, which is similar to Orwell's Thought Police. The Nazi regime also utilized scapegoats like the Jews and Allied forces to garner support and focus their military/political agenda. The Nazi regime's use of scapegoats is similar to how Big Brother utilizes Emmanuel Goldstein in the novel.

3. The Hitler Youth was a partially paramilitary organization for German adolescents that promoted and taught the Nazi regime's political agenda and ideology and fostered a sense of nationalism and ethnic prejudice among German youth. The Hitler Youth is similar to the Junior Spies organization in 1984, through which the children of Party members are taught Big Brother's ideology and encouraged to identify political dissidents.

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Orwell's construction of Big Brother as a form of government in which the centralized executive proceeds unchecked and unlimited closely parallels Nazism.  For Orwell, there is a danger in an absolute authority in which there is little check or limitation of power.  Orwell understood Nazism to pose the same kind of threat to its people as the government in 1984. The outgrowth of the Holocaust and the dangers of silencing voices becomes the overall message of a government in which there is no institutional check on its power and little ability for individual citizens to recall its government.  At the same time, Orwell's novel depicts the underlying dangers of "groupthink."  When all people are conditioned to think the same and not diverge in the variance of thought, Orwell sees danger.  It was certainly the case of Nazi Germany.  Few, if any, understood the powerful implications of speaking out, operating as a voice of dissent in a setting that preached groupthink.  Orwell recognizes this danger in his novel, one that springs out of what was seen in the social rise and conformity in the groupthink of Nazism.  The lack of free will and of individual freedom to serve as a check against the political machinery of a government in which the central authority has grown out of control is a political reflection of Nazi Germany.  The rise of individual compliance with groupthink and the lack of individual voice of dissent becomes its social reflection.

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