What are the three significances of Juliet's speech in Act 3 Scene 2 Line 73-85 of Romeo and Juliet?These three significances should correspond to one BIG IDEA or MAIN THEME for a strong thesis...

What are the three significances of Juliet's speech in Act 3 Scene 2 Line 73-85 of Romeo and Juliet?

These three significances should correspond to one BIG IDEA or MAIN THEME for a strong thesis statement. Please give example or briefly explain using specific support from the text, just so it's clear :) Thank you.

1 Answer | Add Yours

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, it is the conflicts between the intense love of Juliet and Romeo and the hatred that divides their families that predominates throughout the play. Juliet's reflections in Act III, Scene 2, lines 73-85 delineate this love/hate motif.  For, when Juliet learns of Tybalt's death she does the following:

  • She speaks in contrasting images:  "serpent heart/flowering face, dragon/fair cave, beautiful tyrant, fiend/angelic, wolfish-rabid lamb, damned saint, honorable villain."
  • Juliet's speech employs light/dark imagery, which also prevails throughout the play: "fiend angelical, dove-feather'd raven
  • Her speech uses the metaphor of a book, which has also been used when her mother speaks to her of Paris--"the precious book of love" as a suitor in Act I, Scene 3 contrasting it with another metaphor of a palace:

Was ever book containing such vile matter

So fairly bound?  O that deceit should dwell

In such a gorgeous palace! (3.2.83-85)

The dichotomy of Juliet's speech refects the dichotomy of the love/hate theme of Romeo and Juliet. 

We’ve answered 318,990 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question