What are three reasons that demonstrate why Charlie's life wasn't better after the surgery?

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In "Flowers for Algernon" by Daniel Keyes , it could be argued that Charlie's life was not a better one after his surgery. As he became more and more intelligent, Charlie realized, for example, that the people he thought were his friends from work really were not. They...

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In "Flowers for Algernon" by Daniel Keyes, it could be argued that Charlie's life was not a better one after his surgery. As he became more and more intelligent, Charlie realized, for example, that the people he thought were his friends from work really were not. They used and abused him. They made fun of him and did some pretty terrible things to him. However, before he gained intelligence, he really thought they were his friends. He loved them and he laughed along with them. As an intelligent man, he lost that. Once he saw who his co-workers really were, he no longer had them as his friends.

Charlie also quickly left everyone behind with his newfound intelligence. He got to the point where it was almost impossible to communicate with anyone including the doctors who performed the surgery.

And finally, he fell in love with Miss Kinnian but quickly surpassed her intelligence, so that they both knew their love would never work. 

Though Charlie got to experience a life he never would have had, he lost at least as much as he gained.

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