What are three quotes in the book To Kill a Mockingbird that talk about Scout?

2 Answers | Add Yours

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

One of my favorite quotes concerning Scout comes following the attack by Bob Ewell on Halloween night. As Jem is being tended to by the doctor, Aunt Alexandra turns her often dormant mothering instincts toward Scout. Instead of grilling Scout about what happened on the way home from the pageant, Alexandra

... brought me something to put on, and had I thought about it then, I would have never let her forget it: in her distraction, Aunty brought me my overalls. "Put these on, darling," she said, handing me the garments she most despised.

Scout's Uncle Jack felt guilty after having spanked Scout for beating up on her cousin Francis during a Christmas visit to Finch's Landing. He apologized to Atticus and kept his promise to Scout, not telling his brother what the fight was about.

"Her use of the bathroom invective leaves nothing to the imagination. But she doesn't know the meaning of half she says--she asked me what a whore-lady was..."

At the beginning of Chapter 12, Scout notices a change in Jem, who is growing into adolescence. In a fit of irritability, Jem tells Scout,

"It's time you started bein' a girl and acting right!"

cli-gk's profile pic

cli-gk | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

The first quote about Scout that I notice comes from Jem near the beginning of the story when they meet Dill. Jem says, "Scout yonder's been readin' ever since she was born, and she ain't even started to school yet."

One of my favorite passages about Scout is found early in Chapter 2. (Page 17 in the Warner Books paperback)  Scout is in the first grade on the first day of school. The new teacher, Miss Caroline has printed the alphabet on the board. she calls on Scout to read it. Scout read it. Then ". . . after making me read most of My First Grade Reader and the stock market quotes from The Mobile Register aloud, she discovered that I was literate and looked at me with more than faint distaste."

Another great word picture of Scout appears in Chapter 9 (p. 84) as she defends her father's honor against some racist remarks by Francis.   "This time I split my knuckle to the bone on his front teeth. My left impaired, I sailed in with my right, but not for long."

These quotes reveal the character Scout to be precocious, unintimidated, and fierce. From the rest of the narration I get the impression that Scout is intelligent, observant, principled, loyal, and a tomboy.

We’ve answered 318,989 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question