What are three prejudices found in both To Kill a Mockingbird and Flowers for Algernon?In the two books, To Kill a Mockingbird and Flowers for Algernon, there are many different types of...

What are three prejudices found in both To Kill a Mockingbird and Flowers for Algernon?

In the two books, To Kill a Mockingbird and Flowers for Algernon, there are many different types of prejudices. What three are found in both books?

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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The first prejudice that I would say unites both novels is that against those who are intellectually challenged. Charlie with his IQ  of 70 and Boo Radley with his isolation and lack of communication are both figures of derision and ridicule in society and are cruelly regarded by others.

Another prejudice I would see is that regarding sex drive and sexual activity. Tom Robinson is gauged in the novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ as being responsible for ravaging Mayella Ewell. At the time it was considered that black men had tremendous sexual urges. The possibility that Mayella may have been attempting to initiate physical contact was almost impossible to conceive. Similarly, Charlie was repressed by his mother who feared that as he was of subnormal intelligence he may seek to abuse his ‘normal ‘sister.

A final prejudice would be the suspicion towards change in others. When Boo Radley is trying to communicate positively with th children through the gifts in the knot-hole, his family are swift to prevent this dialogue.  When Charlie becomes increasingly more intelligent, his co-workers are so uncomfortable that the petition for his dismissal.

 

 

 

 

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