What is are three examples of parental love vs. parental control in Othello ?They dont mention Brabantio but a few times and I'm not sure how to use his anger of his daughter's marriage to Othello...

What is are three examples of parental love vs. parental control in Othello ?

They dont mention Brabantio but a few times and I'm not sure how to use his anger of his daughter's marriage to Othello as an example of that binary. Please tell me what Act and Scene to find example! Thank You!

Asked on by abrodnax

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susan3smith | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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You are right to focus on Brabantio.  He is the only father mentioned in Shakespeare's Othello, and he does show both love and a desire for control in the first act of the play.  Iago and Roderigo inform Brabantio that his daughter Desdemona has eloped with Othello.  Iago, of course, uses the crudest terms to describe this elopement. In Act 1, scene 1,  both Iago and Roderigo speak of Desdemona as a possession, a jewel, that has been stolen from Brabantio.  And, indeed, when Brabantio finds out for himself that Desdemona is gone, he thinks he has been robbed. In Act 1, scene 2, Brabantio calls Othello a "foul thief."  The language is important here.  Brabantio is very hurt, broken-hearted, to find that his daugher has eloped.  This reaction shows his love for her.  But he speaks of her as a possession, something that once belonged to him, something over which he had control, an object that has been stolen.  In scene 3, before the duke, he declares that he is glad that he does not have other daughters, because he would watch them much more closely than he did Desdemona.

The reader can't help but wonder if much of Brabantio's harsh reaction to the marriage of his daughter to Othello is not the result of hurt pride rather than because of the love he has for his daughter.  Brabantio's last words in the play are as follows:

Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see.

She has deceiv'd her father, and may thee.

Brabantio admits that he has lost control of his daughter.  According to him, Desdemona has tricked him and deceived him.  Brabantio does not respect his daughter enough to honor her decision to marry Othello.

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