What are three examples of alliteration in the poem "Paul Revere's Ride"?  

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Alliteration exists when the beginning sounds of consecutive words are similar. The phrase "lovely lilies," for example, repeats the "L" sound at the beginning of both words. Alliteration is one of many literary devices used in poetry to create a rhythmic pattern of words.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's " Paul...

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Alliteration exists when the beginning sounds of consecutive words are similar. The phrase "lovely lilies," for example, repeats the "L" sound at the beginning of both words. Alliteration is one of many literary devices used in poetry to create a rhythmic pattern of words.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "Paul Revere's Ride" uses alliteration throughout the poem for the purpose of creating a sing-song pattern that is reminiscent of the feeling of riding a horse along a path.

In the second stanza of the poem, Longfellow writes, "Ready to ride and spread the alarm," where Ready and ride both share R sounds.

The first four lines of the penultimate stanza read:

You know the rest. In the books you have read,
How the British Regulars fired and fled,
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard-wall,

Rest and read begin with R sounds, fired and fled repeat the F sound, ball and ball are the same word and therefore the entire sound is the same, and finally, fence and farmyard both begin with the F sound.

The poem ends with, "And the midnight message of Paul Revere." Midnight and message repeat an initial M sound.

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Alliteration is defined as the repetition of the initial letter or sound of a word within a single line (in poetry) or sentence (prose). It can be repeated just twice or more than that. It is a form of figurative language often used in poetry for different effects. In general, alliteration gives a certain rhythm to a poem, or line of a poem, and this is certainly the case in this poem. 

In the poem "Paul Revere's Ride" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, we can find multiple examples of alliteration. Here are just a few:

"Ready to ride and spread the alarm"

Here the "r" sound is repeated.

"Wanders and watches with eager ears,"

Here we have the "wa" sound repeated, as well as the "ea" sound.

"The muster of men at the barrack-door,"

In this line the "m" sound is repeated.

"Masses and moving shapes of shade, —"

In this line there are two separate examples of alliteration, that of the "m" and the "sh."

"Struck out by a steed that flies fearless and fleet"

And again we have two instances of alliteration within one line, first the "st" sound and then the "f" sound, which is repeated three times.

More can be found throughout the poem, but here are a few examples.

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