What three effects happen when the dad leaves in "The Right To the Streets of Memphis"?

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When the father leaves in "The Right To the Streets of Memphis," his departure results in great suffering for his family.

First, the children have to endure persistent hunger. The narrator tells us that until his father left, he had never associated the presence of his father with the availability...

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When the father leaves in "The Right To the Streets of Memphis," his departure results in great suffering for his family.

First, the children have to endure persistent hunger. The narrator tells us that until his father left, he had never associated the presence of his father with the availability of food in the house.

Second, the narrator's mother becomes depressed. She manages to find work and to bring in some income. But she often cries when she is home. During these emotional moments, she delivers long lectures to her children. For their part, the children only feel a "vague dread" upon hearing that they must learn to fend for themselves.

Third, the narrator discovers that he must fight to survive on the streets of Memphis. When the narrator's mother orders him to purchase some groceries for the family, the narrator is set upon by neighborhood bullies. They steal his money, and he has to return home without his groceries. Eventually, the narrator's mother gives him more money and a big stick. She tells him that she will whip him if he returns without the groceries.

Desperate and frightened, the narrator fights like a cornered animal when the bullies set upon him once more. He wields his stick mercilessly and leaves the bullies nursing their heads in disbelief. When the parents of the bullies threaten him, the narrator screams that they will suffer the same fate if they continue harassing him. Intimidated, the adults leave him alone. The narrator maintains that he won the rights to the streets of Memphis that night.

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