What threat do the ghosts pose in the novella The Turn of the Screw and what textual details support the answer?

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There is no textual evidence that the ghosts pose any real, direct threat to the children. The children never admit to seeing or interacting with the ghosts. The ghosts, however, seem to pose an indirect threat to the children through the governess. Since she is the only person who admits to seeing...

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There is no textual evidence that the ghosts pose any real, direct threat to the children. The children never admit to seeing or interacting with the ghosts. The ghosts, however, seem to pose an indirect threat to the children through the governess. Since she is the only person who admits to seeing the ghosts, she becomes fixated with protecting the children's innocence and at times believes that the children are under the ghosts' direct influence. The governess's overprotection, obsession, and suspicion harm the well-being of the children, the stability of Bly, and cause Flora to be so frightened that she has to be taken away. The only threat the ghosts pose is a threat to the governess's sanity.

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