What thoughts and feelings about The Lake Isle of Innisfree are expressed?

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The poem "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" tells of a daydream the poet has while he walks the streets of a city, as he says: "while I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey." He longs for a simple life far from the noise and filth all around him.

The poet's daydream is quite vivid. He will build a small cabin of sticks and rods, plant beans, and keep honey bees. He will hear only soothing natural sounds such as the humming of the bees, the chirping of crickets, and the lapping of waves on the lakeshore. Instead of vistas of buildings, traffic, and pedestrians he will enjoy glowing noontimes and glimmering evenings on the peaceful isle.

Although he walks city streets, his thoughts are full of this peaceful place that he has imagined and the quality of life he would have there. He feels unrequited longing, but also having this vision, even if he cannot fulfill it, also probably gives him a feeling of peacefulness and serenity.

The lake isle of Innisfree is a real place, and Yeats spent childhood summers there. In his autobiography he describes having a similar experience to the one he writes of in this poem while walking along a street in London. That's one reason why the thoughts and feelings expressed in this poem are so vivid.

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As he stands on the "roadway" or sidewalk ("pavements"), the speaker dreams with joy and longing of the Lake Isle of Innisfree. It is an idealized place of peace and quiet. It is a place he longs for so that he can be close to nature. He imagines living in a cabin there with a beehive outside and nine rows of beans.

His house is near gently lapping water, and all parts of the day on the isle are marked with beauty from morning to noon to night:

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow, /Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings; /There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow, /And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

Whether his lake isle refuge is real or not, the speaker derives feelings of happiness and repose by thinking of this Edenic setting, where all is lovely and harmonious. Today, we call such locations that we can imagine and "go to" when we are stressed our "happy place." The lake isle is the narrator's happy place.

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In William Butler Yeats’ poem “The Lake Isle of Innisfree” he speaks of the solitary contentment and “peace” he feels when he thinks of the small lake island. On the island, he is able to leave behind the sights and sounds of the city, and retreat to the small, sod cabin surrounded by a garden. The sounds of the city are exchanged for the hum of bees.

His heartfelt emotions draw him to the Isle of Innisfree. In his mind he hears the water as it laps upon the shore and he is able to be with nature in his thoughts. He recalls how the days on the island pass with the sounds of the bees leading to those of the crickets and linnets at evening. The rising of the sun and its setting bring him a feeling of “peace.”

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow, Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
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