What is Thomas Paine trying to say?Does he think that the colonists were justified in breaking away from Britain? No man has a warmer wisher for reconciliation than myself, before the fatal...

What is Thomas Paine trying to say?Does he think that the colonists were justified in breaking away from Britain? No man has a warmer wisher for reconciliation than myself, before the fatal nineteenth of April, 1775 (Massacre at Lexington), but the moment the event of that day was made known, I rejected the hardened, sullen tempered Pharaoh of England for ever; and disdain the wretch, that with the pretended title of Father of his people, can unfeelingly hear of their slaughter, and composedly sleep with their blood upon his soul.

1 Answer | Add Yours

stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Paine is saying that he had strongly hoped that the colonies and the British government would be able to work out their differences ("wisher for reconciliation") until he heard the news about the events that occurred in Lexington on April 19, 1775. Upon learning of the "massacre," he changed his mind and gave up any consideration of ever reconciling with the King ("the hardened, sullen tempered Pharaoh of England"). He contends that the King no longer has any right to claim the title of "Father of his people" because of his merciless conduct in sending soldiers to fight the colonists, and that the deaths of the colonists are his direct responsibility.

We’ve answered 318,957 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question