What is a thesis statement for growing up in Harper's Lee novel To Kill a Mockingbird?I am using three quotes to support my thesis in my essay: 1. When Scout beats up Walter Cunningham for making...

What is a thesis statement for growing up in Harper's Lee novel To Kill a Mockingbird?

I am using three quotes to support my thesis in my essay: 1. When Scout beats up Walter Cunningham for making her start off the wrong foot. 2. When Scout acts ladylike, following the example of her aunt, during the tea party after hearing about Tom Robinson's death 3. Scout is escorted by Boo Radley to his house and she finally understands him

Any suggestions? Maybe I should change something and use another quote? Because I know that theme is not supposed to be focused on one character and I am having a really hard time with this. Thank you for all your time and effort! :)

 

Asked on by lana852

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lhc | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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I am wondering if what you actually need to do is focus on the dynamic (changing) nature of Scout's character throughout the book.  While a theme is generally considered to be a message or "moral" to the story that can be generalized to the human experience, the three examples you mention above are directly tied to changes in Scout's character in the novel.  The incident at the beginning with Walter is part of Lee's characterization of Scout as an innocent tomboy; the example of her behavior at the tea is an example that demonstrates to us that some of Aunt Alexandra's teachings have started to sink in and that Scout has begun to grow up; and her perceptive treatment of Boo Radley at the novel's end shows us that she has achieved a depth of understanding about human nature that would've been impossible for the Scout of the novel's early pages.  Perhaps this statement might more easily fit your examples:  "Scout Finch changes a great deal throughout Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird.

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