Julie of the Wolves

by Jean George

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What theme is most strongly suggested by Miyax's early memories of her life at seal camp in Jean George's Julie of the Wolves?

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Miyax’s early memories of her life at the seal camp strongly suggest the theme of the importance of family. In particular, her memories of living with her father show the significance of the parent-child bond. In the case of Miyax (who is also called Julie), the connection with her father, Kapugen, is especially meaningful because her mother died when the girl was very young. A closely related theme is the enduring quality of cultural heritage. The customs and activities that Kapungen shared with and taught his daughter later are shown to be extremely valuable in surviving in the tundra.

Miyax’s chances of survival are also enhanced by her positive attitude toward paternal figures. In addition, among the lessons she learned from her father was a positive, respectful attitude toward wolves so she does not fear them when she encounters them. Instead, she is able to apply her affection and respect to the senior male wolf, Amaroq, and other members of the pack.

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