What is the theme of Chapter 3, Book the First of A Tale of Two Cities ?Note that the narrator in the chapter is in a dream state.

1 Answer | Add Yours

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to each other.

In a Gothic setting replete with odd circumstances and isolation, the Dover coach rumbles along with its three occupants bundled against the cold so much as to be unrecognizable.  As they are isolated from one another, so, too, the narrator reflects, are those clustered houses in the city which enclose each its own secret.  The narrator ponders the inscrutability of each individual as does Mr.Lorry who introduces the theme of resurrection with his dark and macabre ponderings.  For, in his dreamlike state, Mr. Lorry perceives himself speaking with a spectre:

Buried how long?

...."Almost eighteen years."

...."You know that you are recalled to life?"

"I can't say."

In this chapter, the theme of Resurrection is introduced as well as the continuation of the motif of doubles. For, with Resurrection there first must be death.  And, Mr. Lorry acts as a double for Dr. Manette as he, too, is imprisoned in Tellson's which is described in a latter chapter as a dark, gothic prison-like place into which one falls and can be imprisoned for years.

We’ve answered 318,983 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question