To Autumn Questions and Answers
by John Keats

Start Your Free Trial

What is the theme of "To Autumn" by Keats?

Expert Answers info

David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2017

write11,088 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Law and Politics

In "To Autumn" Keats accepts the passing of this most radiant of seasons with calm and equanimity. However beautiful the luscious bounties of nature on display may be, he knows that they will soon pass, for winter is on its way. Yet at the same time, the imminent prospect of seasonal change does not upset him in the slightest. For he knows, as do we all, that autumn will come round once more when the time is ripe. And then, yet again, the poetic eye will behold a scene of "mists and mellow fruitfulness."

As with many of Keats's poems, the description of nature in "To Autumn" is both resolutely earthly, and yet at the same time filled with a transcendence that hints at another world entirely. It is the interaction between these two different, yet complementary worlds, that provides the poem's thematic basis.

It is the very transcendence of autumn that explains why Keats accepts its imminent transition to the harshness of...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 482 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

mwestwood eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2006

write16,150 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial