What thematically-related insights do Scout and Dill receive outside the courtroom?What thematically related insights do Scout and Dill receive outside the courtroom? Please answer...

What thematically-related insights do Scout and Dill receive outside the courtroom?

What thematically related insights do Scout and Dill receive outside the courtroom?

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Asked on by xbro

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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There are literally dozens of examples throughout the novel, but I assume you are speaking of Jem and Scout's encounters on the day of the trial. During this time they discover many new things. (The examples below cover the primary themes of the novel, including Loss of Innocence, Ignorance vs. Knowledge, Courage vs. Cowardice, Predjudice vs. Tolerance, Innocence vs. Guilt.)

Before the trial begins, the kids watch the crowds of citizens pour into town for the trial.

  • They witness Dolphus Raymond "lurch by" on his horse. They assume--incorrectly--that he is drunk. (Tolerance)
  • Jem comments that the Mennonites "can't shave after they marry" because their wives "like for 'em to tickle 'em with their beards." (Ignorance, Loss of Innocence)
  • Scout learns from Jem the definition of a "mixed child" when they further discuss Mr. Raymond. (Loss of Innocence, Knowledge)
  • Jem and Scout discover that Atticus was appointed to defend Tom Robinson, and that he did not volunteer. (Knowledge, Loss of Innocence)

When Dill's crying becomes uncontrollable, he and Scout take a break outside where they meet Mr. Raymond up close and personal.

  • They discover that Mr. Raymond is friendly and generous. (Knowledge)
  • They find that the drink in the paper bag is only Coca-Cola--not whiskey. (Knowledge, Loss of Innocence)
  • They determine that Mr. Raymond prefers the company of Negroes. (Tolerance, Knowledge)
  • Mr. Raymond reminds the children to just "step back inside the courthouse" to see the racial prejudice that fills the townspeople. (Prejudice, Tolerance)

After the jury breaks to decide a verdict, Jem and Scout take a break for supper

  • Jem is certain of an acquittal. (Innocence)
  • Calpurnia is angry that the children witnessed the rape trial. Miss Rachel has "run distracted lookin' for you." Aunt Alexandra "nearly fainted." (Tolerance)

Tom is found guilty.

  • Jem is angry, and it is his "turn to cry." (Loss of Innocence)

 

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