What is that change in language that took place during the British colonial era? At the British colonial era, the British mix with their colonies. As a result of this English language underwent...

What is that change in language that took place during the British colonial era?

At the British colonial era, the British mix with their colonies. As a result of this English language underwent some changes. What is that change in language??

1. Emergence of different dialect

2.emergence of  different type of local language

3.  -----

4. -------

5. -------

Asked on by mubin2712

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I am not permitted to provide you with answers to all of your questions. Each specific question must be posted separately. However, I can give you an overview of how the English language changed between the late 1400s through the 1700s, which appears to encompass most of the British colonial period.

To start, English—until the arrival of the Norman French with the invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066—was mainly made up of Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, and language brought by the Jutes. With this early invasion, the language in the British Isles was a melting pot. When William arrived, the language of the noblemen was French, and the language of the common man was English. Over several hundred years, the two languages merged. English remained dominant in a sense because the working classes were those in charge of building this new nation William and his followers had created. However, it is at this point that a great deal of French became a permanent part of the English language as a whole (i.e., rendezvous).

At the end of the medieval period, with an emerging middle class (sheep farming allowed peasants to leave the feudal manors and make money), more people could afford to be taught to read. This type of English had become what we would refer to today as Middle English, having developed from Old English. However, we would not be able to understand either version today.

Between 1500-1800, there was something happening with the language that is now referred to as the Great Vowel Shift. Words were changing in that the pronunciation became shorter and shorter.  As your question originally alluded to, during expanded British colonization, words were now entering the common usage of the English language from countries England had "brought into the British Empire."

With the advent of the printing press, more printed materials were produced, which over time became more affordable to the growing middle class. It also meant that a standard form of English was being put into print which slowed the constant "morphing" of the language. More people were able to read now than ever before. Even grammar and spelling solidified, and in 1604, the first dictionary was published.

Language has changed since then, but it happens more gradually. The Industrial Revolution (beginning in England before arriving in America almost 100 years later), for instance, introduced new words into English. Even today, with the advent of the Internet and new forms of technology, old words have taken on new meaning ("surfing the web"), and new words have been created ("blogging").

The English language is a living, evolving thing. It continues to grow and change.

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