Rudyard Kipling

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What techniques does the poem 'If' by Rudyard Kipling use to get his message across?

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In his inspiring poem, "If," Rudyard Kipling makes use of many rhetorical devices among which are anaphora, anastrophe, antithesis, assonance,climax, hendiadys, hyperbole, metaphor,personification,and syllepsis. 

Here are examples of these aforementioned rhetorical terms:

1.  Anaphora - The repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or lines.  (This is been thoroughly covered by the previous poster)

2.  Anastrophe - Transposition of normal word order

"Yours is the Earth...."

3.  Antithesis - Opposition, or contrast of ideas or words in a balanced or parallel construction.  There are numerous examples of this

"If all men count with you, but none too much"

4.  Assonance - The repetition of the same sound in words close to each other.

"And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise"

5.  Climax - Arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of ascending power.  Often the last emphatic word in one phrase or clause is repeated as the first emphatic word of the next.

The last stanza exemplifies this term.  The poem is very moving because of this build-up.

6.  Hendiadys - Use of two words connected by a conjunction, instead of suordinating one to the other, to express a single complex idea.

There are numerous examples of this term, as well.  Here is one:  "Or walk with Kings-nor lose the common touch"

7. Hyperbole - Exaggeration for emphasis or for rhetorical effect

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 510 words.)

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