The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde book cover
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What are the symbols in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

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Rebecca Hope eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Some of the interesting symbols that appear in Robert Louis Stevenson's novella are the drug, Jekyll's and Hyde's hands, and the written letters and reports.

While the drug Dr. Jekyll created was meant specifically to separate the good from the evil part of man, it symbolizes addiction to anything that brings out the worst in someone. Jekyll finds himself coming more and more under the influence of Hyde and the drug; eventually, the drug is not required to turn Jekyll into Hyde. Jekyll's struggles to keep Hyde at bay mirror an addict's struggle to remain sober or in control.

Stevenson contrasts Jekyll's hands with Hyde's hands. When Jekyll returns to his own home, falling asleep as Jekyll but waking up as Hyde, he confirms his status by viewing his hand. Hyde's...

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mjaaaz | Student

You could also say about the size and looks of Hyde.
He was significantly smaller than Jekyll and uglier, suggesting that in every person, the amount of badness within them, is smaller (Hyde) than the amount of goodness (Jekyll)!!!!

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