What is the summary for Mount Vernon Love Story by Mary Higgins Clark?

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Noelle Thompson | High School Teacher | eNotes Employee

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Well, let us begin by exploring the title of the book. The full title is called Mount Vernon Love Story: A Novel of George and Martha Washington. I also find it interesting that the original title was called Aspire to the Heavens (which was the mantra of Washington’s mom).

In short, Mount Vernon Love Story: A Novel of George and Martha Washington is a humorous and insightful view into the life of our first president: George Washington. Washington has quite a few qualities that many of us might not have heard as we grew up in school. Our first president was absolutely huge, over six feet tall (which was seven inches taller than the average). He was also an excellent dancer and horseman. In fact, the Native Americans at the time would continually remark the following (as a result of the latter observation):

He rides his horse like an Indian.

Clark also repels a few upsetting myths, such as how Washington was really in love with Fairfax (the wife of his best friend). There are many incidences of tenderness here both between George and Martha as well as George and his two children.

Clark imparts many of the different events that show the husband’s and wife’s devotion to each other. One of the most prominent in the novel is when Martha endures the hardships of Valley Forge with her husband. Another very different show of devotion was George’s pet name for Martha: “my dearest Patsy.” Clark makes it clear that Martha Washington was only known as “Martha” in history books. All of her closest friends and family members called her Patsy. George Washington always wore a locket containing a picture of his “dearest Patsy” around his neck.

In conclusion, please realize that even though the book was written in 1969, it was just reissued under the new title because it was finally found by one of George Washington’s descendants who wanted it to be clearer that the book was, in fact, an account of basic truth.

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