What is a summary of Dworkin's Law's Empire?

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Law’s Empire is a book written by Ronald Dworkin , who is a renowned professor of jurisprudence at Oxford University, about the principles and rules on which the Anglo-American legal system is based. It revolves around the question that is very important to all legal practice: when faced with a...

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Law’s Empire is a book written by Ronald Dworkin, who is a renowned professor of jurisprudence at Oxford University, about the principles and rules on which the Anglo-American legal system is based. It revolves around the question that is very important to all legal practice: when faced with a difficult case, how do judges decide what the law is, and should they be philosophers? He states that the law must be viewed as an interpretive concept and explains and defines what that interpretation should be. According to the Harvard University Press, Dworkin insists that

the most fundamental point of law is not to report consensus or provide efficient means to social goals, but to answer the requirement that a political community act in a coherent and principled manner toward all its members.

He argues that a plain and simple case doesn’t really exist and that all cases hold a certain level of complication to them which makes the interpretation of the law the most crucial and pivotal part in jurisdiction and, certainly, a more important process than its application. For a judge to decide what the law requires, they must consider all known facts, the law’s previous implementations, and the practices in which said law was or is incorporated. Dworkin writes:

We live in and by the law. It makes us what we are: citizens and employees and doctors and spouses and people who own things. . . . We are subjects of law's empire, liege-men to its methods and ideals, bound in spirit while we debate what we must therefore do.

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