What is the summary to Chapter 5 in Adam of the Road?

The story takes place in England, in the late 12th century. In the first two chapters, Adam's father is a minstrel traveling with a family on their way to London. Adam is an apprentice of his father, and accompanies him. They are traveling with Sir Edmund de Lisle and his wife Richenda, who have five noblemen in their company. The six men-at-arms ride in front of the carriage that Adam and his father are riding in. When they are stopped by Hugh (Sir Edmund's nephew), Roger is ordered to entertain the ladies of the carriage by singing about Orpheus and Eurydice (see Mythology).

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In Chapter 5, Sir Edmund's family is traveling to London.

Roger and Adam are in the retinue. Roger is a trained minstrel, and Adam is his son. They ride for a time until Hugh approaches them with an order. Hugh is Sir Edmund's nephew and finds great pleasure in ignoring...

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In Chapter 5, Sir Edmund's family is traveling to London.

Roger and Adam are in the retinue. Roger is a trained minstrel, and Adam is his son. They ride for a time until Hugh approaches them with an order. Hugh is Sir Edmund's nephew and finds great pleasure in ignoring Adam, whom he detests.

Accordingly, Roger is to entertain Lady Richenda (Sir Edmund de Lisle's wife) and her fellow travelers. Roger rides up to the carriage on his horse (Bayard) and begins to sing about the adventures of Sir Orfeo.

After a few moments, Lady Richenda tells Roger that Adam and his dog, Nick, can ride in the carriage. So, this is how Adam and Nick find themselves in a carriage full of ladies. Lady Richenda is traveling with both her daughters, Emilie and Margery, and two other ladies. Margery is kind to Adam, and she teases him as he relaxes in the back of the carriage.

Meanwhile, Roger continues to entertain the ladies as he rides alongside the carriage. Eventually, the exhausted Adam falls asleep. He wakes up when the carriage is jolted. Upon waking, Adam decides to accompany his father by playing on his harp. However, Adam had forgotten to tune his harp. This unfortunate miscalculation, coupled with his sleepiness, leads him to play several incongruent melodies. Meanwhile, Emilie makes a joke about Adam's skill, and the ladies laugh.

This embarrasses Adam greatly.

Margery tries to comfort him, but Adam is too upset to accept her kind gesture. He hops out of the carriage and begins walking. Eventually, Simon (a squire) calls to Adam and asks after the lady Emilie (whom he is in love with). Still peevish, Adam tells Simon that Emilie made fun of his skills and caused all the ladies to laugh at him. Then, Adam plays his harp in the same manner as he did in the carriage. This causes Simon to laugh, and eventually, the two travel on in good spirits.

Adam sings and plays his harp, while Simon accompanies him on his flute. The story ends with a grand meal at the de Lisle mansion in London. Adam is so tired that he does not finish eating. In the midst of the meal, he creeps away and falls asleep next to Nick on the fresh rushes.

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In Chapter 5, Adam and his father Roger are on the road to London with a group of travelers, the party of Sir Edmund de Lisle.  Towards the end of the day, they are rudely summoned by Hugh to tell stories to the women in Lady Richenda's carriage.  Margery, the girl about his own age whom Adam noticed earlier, requests that Adam and Nick be allowed to ride in the carriage awhile also, because she knows they must be tired.  Adam tries to help his father by playing his harp, but he has forgotten to tune it, and everyone laughs.  Although the ladies are kind, Adam is humiliated, and jumps off the carriage to walk.  He meets a young squire named Simon, who is in love with Emilie, one of the ladies in the carriage.  Adam teaches Simon a song to sing and play on his flute, while Adam accompanies him with his harp.

The party finally arrives in London, and Adam, Roger, and Nick have a swim in the river.  They are to stay at the de Lisle's fine house, and after a generous meal, Adam curls up with his dog Nick and falls fast asleep.

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