What is the summary for An Assembly Such as This by Pamela Aidan?

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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Pamela Aidan -- A Biography

Pamela Aidan, born in Pennsylvania (1953), is a librarian who has a master's degree in library and information science. Living in Idaho and having broad experience as a librarian, Aidan turned her hand to retelling her favorite tale: Jane Austen's matchless Pride and Prejudice, the story of romance between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. Writing from Mr. Darcy's point of view, the early part of Austen's Pride and Prejudice is retold, with Darcy's psychological sketch, feelings and motivations described. Aidan has followed this, her first novel, up with a Darcy trilogy and a fourth Regency novel.

An Assembly Such as This -- A Summary

Beginning with his decent from Bingley's carriage to attend the Meryton Assembly, the classic ballroom scene is described in which Darcy shuns Elizabeth as being not handsome enough for his taste. The story then sweeps along through Darcy's reactions to and feelings toward Jane and Elizabeth's parents and sisters. He is none too merciful as he recognizes their considerable faults, and he is none too merciful as he begins to see how Jane is affecting Bingley.

Darcy's downfall is ever Elizabeth's "fine eyes," quickened when she walks from Longbourn to Netherfield to nurse her ill sister, Jane, the victim of Mrs. Bennet's manipulations of Jane's budding romance. Darcy's persistent enemy is introduced in the person of Mr. Wickham, and Darcy's emotions and reactions are given voice to. Aidan's story ends after Darcy, his friend--the newly created Dy--and the Bingley sisters (Miss Bingley and Mrs. Hurst) connive to extricate Bingley from the loving enchantment of Jane and get him away from Netherfield for the Christmas season. Darcy goes back home to Pemberley and to Georgiana, his beloved younger sister, to muse and pine over Elizabeth's eyes, finding Bingley luckier than he himself is since there is no one to extricate him from Elizabeth's unwitting enchantment.

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