What is the style of James Joyce?about the dead

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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Joyce said in correspondence that his goal was to betray the paralysis of the Irish people; all of the stories touch on some form of paralysis, whether emotional, psychological, physical, or moral, and none more explicitly than “Araby,” especially its closing tableau. Second, Joyce sometimes used the concept of “epiphany” or “revelation” about one of the major strategies of the stories. In this story, "The Dead", the only possible “epiphany” would seem to take place in the reader: the protagonists of these stories clearly remain blind to their own paralyses until the end.

This closing piece from Dubliners  is Joyce’s best-known story; it’s also the collection’s longest by a good bit, and dividing the story into three main parts helps to focus class discussion. The first section is made up of the conversation and events leading up to the dinner (the night of the story is the Feast of Epiphany, or Twelfth Night); the story’s middle section comprises the dinner, and Gabriel’s after-dinner speech; and the closing section includes the breaking-up of the party, Gabriel and Gretta’s journey to the Gresham Hotel, and the climactic scene that plays out there. The controversy over the story’s conclusion centers on whether or not Gabriel has had an “epiphany”—hether the day’s events, and his wife’s revelation, will show him that a change of heart is needed; or whether, instead, he is hardening his heart against his wife and against anyone who would challenge his image of himself.

The controversy over the story’s conclusion centers on whether or not Gabriel has had an “epiphany”—the day's events, and his wife’s revelation, will show him that a change of heart is needed; or whether, instead, he is hardening his heart against his wife and against anyone who would challenge his image of himself.

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