What are the stylistic elements , rhyme , rhythm and the pattern and relationships that bind the words to sense and sound in sonnet 64 ?I'm doing a write-up on sonnet 64 of shakespeare's speech but...

What are the stylistic elements , rhyme , rhythm and the pattern and relationships that bind the words to sense and sound in sonnet 64 ?

I'm doing a write-up on sonnet 64 of shakespeare's speech but i can't seem to find the materials i need anywhere and decided to try my luck here :)

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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Shakespearean (also known as Elizabethan or English) sonnets follow the same rhyme scheme. The sonnet is comprised of fourteen lines. There are three four-line stanzas (like paragraphs in writing), which represents twelve lines, and one rhyming couplet, representing the last two lines. The rhyme scheme for this kind of sonnet is created with the following pattern of end rhyme (rhyming with last word of a line):

ABAB CDCD EFEF GG

Though the rhyme scheme above visually separates the stanzas and rhyming couplet from each other, most of the time these sonnets are printed as one long paragraph. Generally, the first two stanzas present a main idea. At the beginning of the third stanza, or the ninth line, there is usually a shift in the focus of the poem; the last two lines, or the rhyming couplet, summarize the sonnet, pulling it all together. A very clear example of this organization can be seen in Sonnet 29.

Shakespeare has written his sonnets in iambic pentameter. This means he attempts to have ten syllables in each line, and then place stress or emphasis on every other syllable. Note the following line from Sonnet 64: the bolded words or syllables indicate where the stress (or emphasis) should fall.

When I have seen by Time's fell hand de-faced...

Therefore, the sound of the sonnet generally comes from the rhyme scheme and the rhythm of the poem. The sense of the poem comes from the poem's main idea. In Sonnet 64, the poet seems to be humbled by the strength of the forces of Time and nature to overwhelm and destroy things that might seem indestructible. The focus of the sonnet then moves to love and explains that within a world of destruction, love will be lost in death, and one is forced to weep in having such a dear thing that one fears so much to lose—and will. Sonnet 64…

...catalogues instances of inevitable destruction so as to provide a consolation for death and places “emphasis on the inescapable fact of mutability” [change].

The central idea is that the speaker's love is lost, but not by the choice of the loved one, and this comforts the speaker in that it could not be avoided—it wasn't the speaker's fault or wish either. There is great concern by the speaker for the loss of life and of love, but no indication of which causes the greater sense of loss.

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