What is the central and most important irony in "The Rocking-Horse Winner"?

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It is ironic indeed that Hester appears to have everything she could ever want in life yet still remains deeply unsatisfied with her lot. No matter how much money Paul wins for her, it's never enough. As the old saying goes you never know what you have until you lose it. And thanks to Hester's insatiable greed and desire for social status she loses what should be the most precious thing in the world to her: her son.

For it's only because of Hester's deep and unaccountable dissatisfaction with life that Paul ends up dying so tragically young. In a classic goose/golden egg scenario, Hester has inadvertently ensured that the steady supply of money that was coming into the house will now dry up completely, leaving her even more dissatisfied than before. With her son now dead, she will find out—probably for the first time in her pampered life—what it's really like not to have enough money.

Hester always intended that Paul's rocking horse rides would bring her wealth and enhanced social...

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