What steps should I take after college graduation to become a high school teacher? I am now a senior at the University of South Florida, with about a year until I finished my degree in English...

What steps should I take after college graduation to become a high school teacher? 

I am now a senior at the University of South Florida, with about a year until I finished my degree in English (literary studies). What steps should I start taking so that I can become employed, before my student loan debts eat me alive? I'm currently a substitute teacher, and would like to teach high school.

Asked on by coryengle

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lentzk's profile pic

Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I forgot to mention this in my previous post, but you should also try to go to as many job fairs and get as many interview as possible to get a feel for the questions that will be asked of you.  I interviewed for about five positions I really wasn't too interested in and took notes after my interviews.  I made a list of questions that seemed common or I thought were likely to show up and practiced them.  By the time I got to the interviews I was hoping to earn a job offer from I really had a good feel for what to expect and I was much more confident in the interview.

wannam's profile pic

wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

Most states require you to take the Praxis or some other examination as well as completing specific course work in order to obtain certification.  To teach in a public school, you will need to be licensed.  If you are already substitute teaching, you may want to use some of your connections to ask specific questions for your state and your local school system.  Some states offer a lateral entry program where you can begin teaching before you obtain a license. However, some school systems have enough licensed teachers to draw from and do not hire lateral entry (or unlicensed) teachers.  Whatever path you need to take in your state, I encourage you to get your application and resume submitted as soon as possible.  Be sure you are creating a separate teaching resume.  A school is going to be far more interested in your teaching and educational experience than your side jobs.  Try creating a resume with only your teaching experience listed in the job section.

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Be sure to check with the Florida Department of Education to complete all necessary applications and testing to qualify and certify you to teach in the Sunshine State. Most importantly, don't wait for the job to find you. Use any contacts you may have to meet principals, and visit schools in person to request interviews. You may have to commute--I did so in Florida for more than 20 years--from your home rather than move, especially if you end up working in a small town. Although jobs in Florida are scarce--and teacher pay is among the worst in the country--you may want to avoid jumping at the first offer. Be sure you are comfortable with the principal--he/she can be your best friend or worst enemy--and that the classes you are scheduled to teach are satisfactory.

lentzk's profile pic

Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

You are very smart to serve as a substitute, but in addition to that experience use it to build up a network.  Find a way to talk to the principal and ask your questions to him or her.  Do an amazing job, and you might be able to find a position at one of the schools you are working at.  Networking is key- build up new relationships and cultivate your existing ones.

In addition, look for ways to make yourself set apart from others.  Volunteer coach or tutor at a school.  Again, trying to build up new relationships.  Go to job fairs and just talk to people to get a handle on the types of questions you need to be prepared to answer. 

literaturenerd's profile pic

literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I had my BA in English. Lacking the certification needed to teach, I had to return to school to obtain my certification. I was able to do this through a Master's program which gave me both my Master's and the certification needed to teach high school. If you lack your certification, gaining your certification is the first step you need to take.

shake99's profile pic

shake99 | Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I'm assuming that you'll graduate with teaching certification in your state or locality.

Most school systems hire at the county level. You should look up every county you're interested in and find out what kind of hiring process they use. Some systems do it all online, so you can do it all from home.

If you're thinking of teaching in a state that is different than the one you graduated in, make sure your certification will transfer.

rrteacher's profile pic

rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I don't live in Florida, but I can suggest that you get applications out as soon as possible if you are qualified to begin teaching in the fall. From your question, though, it sounds like you may be missing some education courses, which is exactly what my situation was. They are necessary for certification.

In my state, (North Carolina) there was a lateral entry program that allowed people without education degrees to become teachers, and take education courses while you teach. A quick Google search reveals that a similar program may exist in Florida, which is where I assume you're interested in teaching: http://www.altcertflorida.org/programOverview.htm.

My suggestion is that you look into that. Unlike in my day, most of the necessary education classes for certification are available online, which makes the burden of doing your coursework while teaching far less onerous. Some districts will even pay for your classes. Failing that, you may want to look into teaching at a private school. Teach for America is also always interested in non-education majors who are interested in going into teaching.

Best of luck, there is always room somewhere for qualified teachers. 

stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I would suggest moving this to a Discussion Forum so that any current Florida teachers connected to eNotes can provide in-state information and suggestions.

In general, you need to insure that you have completed all coursework that would be necessary for certification, which would probably include student teaching experience. Beyond that, you need to use your substituting and any other connections you might have to start networking with school administrators. Watch the internet for position postings and follow up on anything you see or hear about. Good luck!

kc7092's profile pic

kc7092 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER . YOU NEED TO DO B.ED{AS WE DO IN INDIA}WHICH IS MANDATORY.  TO BECOMER A SCHOOL TEACHER .THAT MEANS YOU WILL BE ENTITLED TO TEACH ABOVE 6 CLASS ONWARDS TO 12.

 

IF YOU DON'T WANT TO TEACH AS YOU CAN COMPLETE YOUR EDUCATION TOO. WHICH MEANS BA OR DEGREE COURSES WE IN INDIA HAVE DELHI UNIVERSITY. THAN POST GRADUATION THEN B.ED

 

WHICH I HAVE DONE.

 

REST YOUR WISH .ALL THE BEST . GOD BLESS YOU.

 

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