What steps in the control process will be important as Starbucks tries to reduce the number of paper cups it uses? How can Starbucks maintain its commitment to reducing waste as it keeps sending...

What steps in the control process will be important as Starbucks tries to reduce the number of paper cups it uses? How can Starbucks maintain its commitment to reducing waste as it keeps sending paper cups to landfills? What benefits does Starbucks gain by controlling this outcome?

Expert Answers
Karen P.L. Hardison eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The control process has four parts (some experts combine the statement of steps two and three):

  1. Establish standard performance measurements.
  2. Measure performance.
  3. Compare performance to standards.
  4. Take corrective action.

Assume the Starbucks vision and mission statements, strategic plan, and organizational objectives—the bedrock of performance control and corrective action—are up-to-date and reflect current sustainability, non-toxic materials, and green practices standards. The steps in the control process that will be important as Starbucks reduces paper cup use are to establish standards for what is an eco-friendly and sustainable number of paper cups to use; measure actual performance in paper cup use; compare that measured quantity to the established standards; and develop and take corrective action.

Since steps one, two, and three are in part or wholly matters of research and leadership discussion, step four will prove the most challenging. In exploring corrective action plans, Starbucks will have to investigate what potential solutions already exist in the marketplace for reducing plastic-lined paper cup use. For instance, if it is determined that reusable glass containers should replace paper cups, in part or wholly, that corrective action employs an already existing solution: glass bottles and cups. Barring a readily implemented, currently available marketplace solution, Starbucks may determine corrective action requires innovating a presently unknown solution. Consequently, the fourth step of taking corrective action may be the most important—and challenging—of the four needed steps.