In Toni Cade Bambara's short story "Raymond's Run," what is Squeaky's attitude?

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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In Toni Cade Bambara's short story "Raymond's Run," Squeaky has an extremely feisty attitude, but there is kindness in her as well.

Squeaky’s job is to watch over her brother Raymond and keep him safe and out of trouble. Her brother George had the job before Squeaky, but wasn't very good at it. Now that Squeaky is in charge, if someone has something to say to or about Raymond, she has no time for talking about it; she just takes action:

I much rather just knock you down and take my chances even if I am a little girl with skinny arms and a squeaky voice...And if things get too rough, I run. And as anybody can tell you, I'm the fastest thing on two feet.

Later Squeaky repeats the sentiment:

I’m ready to fight, cause like I said I don’t feature a whole lot of chit-chat, I much prefer to just knock you down right from the jump and save everybody a lotta precious time.

Squeaky is determined to do a good joy in caring for Raymond—she is extremely protective of him. She is dedicated to running and defensive of Raymond. She is self-confident and realistic about her ability to run faster than almost anyone else. Squeaky is focused not only on her brother's care, but also on her running. She is even forgiving—as seen when she looks at Gretchen (her former rival) through new eyes after the race, recognizing that maybe they can be friends after all.

Maybe she'd like to help me coach Raymond... And she nods to congratulate me and then she smiles. And I smile. We stand there with this big smile of respect between us.

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