What sorts of ironies surround Iago in the first act of Othello?

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In the first act of Othello, Iago practices a kind of verbal irony, which means that he says the opposite of what he truly means. While he detests Othello, he tells Roderigo in a sarcastic manner that he will follow Othello faithfully: "O, sir, content you; I follow him to serve my turn upon him: We cannot all be masters." He says he loves Othello in a moment of sarcasm while harboring only hate towards him. 

Iago also character also contributes to dramatic irony, which is a situation in which the reality of something is not known to a character/characters. While Iago hates Othello, he tells...

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