What are some things which are satirized in Shrek 1 (2001)I know shrek is funny and all that, but i can't seem to identify what it actually satirizes besides the whole fairytale tradition thing. I...

What are some things which are satirized in Shrek 1 (2001)

I know shrek is funny and all that, but i can't seem to identify what it actually satirizes besides the whole fairytale tradition thing. I really want to talk about it satirizing the monarch and stuff but i dont know how...as in techniques wise

 

are there any things that shrek satirizes/ comments on? and what techniques suggest this (film techniques)

 

Asked on by blushii

1 Answer | Add Yours

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think that one of the strongest elements of satire that is present in the film is the depiction of the traditional princess.  At first, Fiona is on the same level as Cinderella and Snow White, yet the film takes a real interesting take on the idea of the "fair princess" in showing Fiona to be a very complex and multidimensional character.  The idea of a fairy tale princess is traditionally a very monolithic depiction.  She is beautiful and fair, as well as waiting for her prince to come and rescue her.  She does not hold any dark secrets and is not struggling with her own identity, as Fiona does.  She sleeps in the cave alone and engages in a process of self hate about her "curse" that makes her an ogress. We don't see this level of self consciousness and, frankly, self hate in other depictions of princess.  Finally, the ending satirizes the notion of "happily ever after."  She kisses Shrek in the end.  If the curse was true, in kissing her beloved, the curse of being a transformed ogress would have been lifted.  The curse was lifted, but she still is an ogress.  In the most unique of ways, the ending is almost post modern, in that Fiona learns that she can never change her identity; she is what she is.  She learns to make peace with her identity, that which caused her a certain repulsion.  When the ending song plays of "I'm a Believer," it might be more of an indication of how she feels about her own identity than anything else.  This is a unique spin on the fairy tale ending and one that is heavily satirized.

We’ve answered 318,989 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question