What are some things that prove that the loss of innocence is inevitable in the novel A Tale of Two Cities?I'm doing an essay on the theme "The Loss of Innocence is Inevitable." And I chose the...

What are some things that prove that the loss of innocence is inevitable in the novel A Tale of Two Cities?

I'm doing an essay on the theme "The Loss of Innocence is Inevitable." And I chose the book A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens to read.  I'm in Advanced English.  I just need a few examples of this from the novel, and a VERY brief summary of the book.  Thank you.  PS. I need it soon.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Your thesis, that loss of innocence is inevitable, is going to be difficult to prove in one sense and overly obvious in another. It is obvious everyone loses innocence because we live in a world full of flawed human beings who make mistakes and hurt one another and are generally more selfish than they ought to be. That is just part of living life, whether one is a living, breathing human being or a character in a story who is living out a fictional life. What will be difficult to prove is that this loss of innocence is inevitable because of the story, not because of the flawed humans that live within its pages.

In A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens presents a story which is full of people and events which could certainly cause one to lose one's innocence. The aristocracy is often cruel and selfish and unjust. We want to believe that everyone has a basic human compassion, but when Monsieur the Marquis runs over and kills a young boy he has no compassion and our innocent belief is destroyed. The revolutionaries, who have been treated abominably, turn around and treat their captors the same way; when they do, some of our innocence is lost. When a man commits treason and is willing to sell his own countrymen to the enemy, innocence is lost. I think a case might be made that there is one character in the novel (Lucie) whose innocence is unchanged, as well; I'm not sure how that fits into the discussion of inevitability.

The loss of innocence is inevitable because humans are, well, human. This is a universal truth which is also true in this novel; Your best approach, probably, is to show how this novel proves the universal truth. It sounds as if you have not read the novel, since you're asking for a summary; it's going to be difficult to adapt anything I give you here to a paper if you don't have the proper context which comes from reading. I would encourage you to read it, as it's one of the great stories of love and sacrifice in literature.

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