What are some symbols in Chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby?

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While the most important symbols in the chapter have been covered by a previous educator, other symbols can be found. One is the sea. We read of Gatsby's vast party with its "sea-change of faces and voices and color" and of the "swirls and eddies of people." This connects us back to Nick's dinner with Daisy, Tom, and Jordan earlier in the novel. The women's white dresses and the window curtains are said to have rose and billowed like sails in the breeze, and the rug in the room is wine colored, like Homer's wine-dark seas in the Iliad. 

The library, with its real books, is a symbol of Gatsby's sophisticated artifice. As Owl Eyes realizes, the books are not fakes, not cardboard. Picking up a book, he says:

It's a bona fide piece of printed matter. It fooled me. This fella's a regular Belasco. It's a triumph. What thoroughness! What realism!

This library symbolizes that Gatsby is not simply a cheap con artist, but a master of theatrical production, like the producer Belasco. He knows how to weave...

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