The Great Gatsby Questions and Answers
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby book cover
Start Your Free Trial

What are some symbols in Chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby?

Expert Answers info

Colin Cavendish-Jones, Ph.D. eNotes educator | Certified Educator

briefcaseCollege Professor, Lawyer

bookM.A. from Oxford University

bookPh.D. from St. Andrews University


calendarEducator since 2019

write2,090 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby is particularly filled with symbols of wealth, opulence and wastefulness. Some of these symbols are very subtle in their suggestiveness. Gatsby has a Rolls-Royce, perhaps the most famous luxury brand of car in the world, but also an English car rather than an American limousine. Gatsby fetishes England, partly because its antiquity trumps the old money of East Egg, but also because it is safely distant. Oxford is a lot older than Yale, but Gatsby can also pretend to have been educated at Oxford with impunity: if he claimed to have gone to Yale, Nick and Tom would both know he was lying. The Rolls-Royce symbolizes not only Gatsby's wealth, but his aspirations.

The crates of oranges and lemons are equally symbolic. To have five crates of them delivered from New York every Friday is an extravagant gesture, and the bright orange and yellow fruits must be as beautiful as flowers. On Monday, they are nothing but pith and skin, as empty and lifeless as the hungover party...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 1,144 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2016

write10,681 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

MaudlinStreet eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2009

write858 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and History

check Approved by eNotes Editorial