What are some similes, metaphors, personification, and sensory references in "The Devil and Tom Walker"?

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As far as sensory imagery goes, I think Washington Irving is especially skillful in weaving in visual imagery, whether this imagery be tied to people or to locations. Consider, for example, his presentation of Tom's greed: he does not merely tell us that Tom and his wife are greedy; rather, he establishes this through visual descriptions of their behavior, with the wife hiding away whatever she could get her hands on while Tom Walker is shown skulking about, seeking out her hidden treasures. However, his use of sensory imagery is particularly striking in his descriptions of physical locations. Take his description of the house they live in:

They lived in a forlorn-looking house, that stood alone and had an air of starvation. A few straggling savin trees, emblems of sterility, grew near it; no smoke ever curled from its chimney; no traveller stopped at its door.

The visual imagery is particularly striking in Irving's description of the swamps, imbuing this place with menace:

The swamp was...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 868 words.)

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