What are some similarities between Lord of the Flies and To Kill a Mockingbird?I am writing a comparative essay on To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies, and it would be helpful if people...

What are some similarities between Lord of the Flies and To Kill a Mockingbird?

I am writing a comparative essay on To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies, and it would be helpful if people could provide some themes that correspond between the two texts.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Great question to think about! These are of course two excellent texts, and so you should have a lot to write about in comparing the themes between them. Here are my ideas, but I have also included the links two the themes section on both texts below, so you can investigate further.

I think one of the biggest themes that you can link to both texts is the way in which there is a definite movement in both stories from innocence to experience, which is normally associated with recognising and understanding the evil in humanity, and in the case of Ralph and the other boys stranded on the island, the evil that is innate in themselves too. Consider the way that at the beginning of the story, both sets of children are rather innocent. Jem and Scout, however, come to learn about the evil nature of discrimination and racism through the events that transpire, and this is something that they experience first hand when they are attacked. The boys too end up crying because they have experienced how innately evil humans are, and how, when free from the restraining influence of civlisation, mankind sinks back to its savage state just as sure as a stone sinks fast in water.

This would be the central comparison that you could talk about, but you also might like to consider the theme of appearances vs. reality in both texts. This of course can be linked to the theme of the move from innocence to experience, as the children in both texts begin to understand that the appearance of things is often a lot more complex than they first perceive.

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