In Pride and Prejudice, what are some quotes that show that Jane Bennet and Mr. Bingley have changed?I have to do an essay on two characters in Pride and Prejudice that have changed, and use some...

In Pride and Prejudice, what are some quotes that show that Jane Bennet and Mr. Bingley have changed?

I have to do an essay on two characters in Pride and Prejudice that have changed, and use some supporting quotes but I can't find any quotes.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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This is a very interesting question because actually I don't think that Jane Bennet and Mr. Bingley do change. They seem to stay as sweet and naive and loveable as they started out. Consider Mr. Bennet's opinion of his daughter's engagement to Mr. Bingley, which, albeit ironically, offers a shrewd assessment of their characters and how much they have not changed:

"I have no doubt of your doing very well together. Your tempers are by no means unlike. You are each of you so complying that nothing will ever be resolved on; so that every servant will cheat you; and so generous that you will always exceed your income."

As is shown, they always loved each other, even in spite of Miss Bingley's interference. No, if you want characters who definitely change in the novel, you need go no further than Mr. Darcy and Lizzie Bennet, who offer ample examples of change and maturing. It is interesting to remember that Jane Austen originally called this book First Impressions, and as such it is a chronicle of how two main characters counted first impressions and judged each other on that basis. If you are looking for quotes, you need go no further than Chapter 58, when Lizzie and Mr. Darcy take a walk. Consider this revelation from Lizzie regarding her openness:

"Yes, you know enough of my frankness to believe me capable of that. After abusing you so abominably to your face, I could have no scruple in abusing you to all your relations."

What is interesting here is that Lizzie is admitting that she was in the wrong in her treatment of Mr. Darcy. She, in other words, has learned to overcome her prejudice and has realised that her first impressions were wrong, just as she was wrong about her first impressions of Mr. Whickham.

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