What are some quotes that show different types of fear in Lord of the Flies?

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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One of the dominant themes in Lord of the Flies is fear.  All of the boys struggle with fear throughout the novel, and their responses to those fears define many of the most pivotal moments in the novel.

Fear that there are no adults on the island:

"'Perhaps there aren't any grownups anywhere.'

The fat boy looked startled. [...]

'Aren't there any grownups at all?'" (8).

Piggy is certainly one of the most frightened of the boys over the lack of grown-up supervision.  Ralph is so happy about the adults' disappearance that he stands on his head, but Piggy shows his concern by asking about the adults more than once.  His concern reveals much about his character; Piggy looks to grow-ups for appreciation and protection.  Without the calming presence of adults, Piggy fears being bullied. 

Fear in lack of structure:

"If I blow the conch and they don't come back; then we've had it.  We shan't keep the fire going. We'll be like animals. We'll never be rescued" (92).

This quote comes in chapter five after Jack and the boys wildly abandon the tribal meeting.  Ralph fears the dissolution of the tribe; he has enough self-perception to recognize that his power as leader has diminished.  He correctly fears that soon the boys will no longer heed the conch or himself as an authority on the island.

Fear of abandonment:

"'They're all dead,' said Piggy, 'an' this is an island. Nobody don't know we're here.  Your dad don't know, nobody don't know--'

His lips quivered and the spectacles dimmed with mist.

'We may stay here till we die' (14). 

Although Ralph remains optimistic about their chances for rescue, counting on his dad to come and save them, Piggy faces the reality of their circumstances.  He immediately perceives the true danger of their situation and understands just how exactly lost the boys really are. 

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