What are some quotes from The Giver that represent loyalty?

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All citizens in the community are loyal to their community to the point of not questioning anything.

No one in the community questions the community. In fact, Jonas often comments about how certain behaviors are considered letting the community down. The community is everything. For example, when Jonas tells about...

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All citizens in the community are loyal to their community to the point of not questioning anything.

No one in the community questions the community. In fact, Jonas often comments about how certain behaviors are considered letting the community down. The community is everything. For example, when Jonas tells about the release of the pilot, he describes it as a failure for the community.

For a contributing citizen to be released from the community was a final decision, a terrible punishment, an overwhelming statement of failure. (Ch. 1)

The concept of togetherness known as Sameness is not questioned by anyone in the community. It means that everyone unquestionably follows the rules. There are many rules, governing everything from how to dress and speak to the telling of feelings and dreams. Everything is designed to keep everyone reliant on the community and loyal to the community.

The ceremonies are a perfect example of community loyalty and togetherness.

The entire community attended the Ceremony each year. For the parents, it meant two days holiday from work; they sat together in the huge hall. Children sat with their groups until they went, one by one, to the stage. (Ch. 6)

There is a ceremony for every age group up to twelve. The fact that all children born in a year “age” together is symbolic. It is designed to build loyalty to the other citizens and to the community. The elders are the ones who assign a person’s job at the Ceremony of Twelve. This is another example of loyalty, because everyone in the community accepts their job without question and the jobs are designed to benefit the community, not the individual.

When Jonas is chosen to be the Receiver of Memory, he learns that unquestioning loyalty to the community is not necessarily a good thing. The first thing he notices is that The Giver has books, unlike the others in the community, and has the ability to turn the Speaker off. 

From the time Jonas begins his training, his loyalty begins to shift. He becomes loyal to the Giver more and more, and to his community less and less. Jonas begins to want more. He develops the ability to see colors, and he learns above love.  Jonas wants there to be love in his community too.

"Things could change, Gabe," Jonas went on. "Things could be different. I don't know how, but there must be some way for things to be different. There could be colors. ... There could be love ..." (Ch. 16)

Jonas demonstrates his shifting loyalty by not taking the Stirrings pills. All other citizens take the pills as soon as they begin puberty. It forestalls hormones and keeps a person in a pre-adolescent state. Jonas stops taking the pills because he wants to feel again. He is no longer willing to blindly follow the community's rules. He is realizing that there are more negative aspects to the community than he ever realized.

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